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Thread: Alternate History Thread

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    Senior Member EnviousDominous's Avatar
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    Alternate History Thread

    We've all done it, some more obsessively than others.

    We've watched the chaotic world of professional wrestling, and wondered what would have transpired if a storyline had taken a different course.

    There's endless possibilities, but if you're like me you obsess over specific occurrences as potentially having a major turning point for prowrestling history.

    I'll share mine, feel free to share yours.


    What if Ted DiBiase had been allowed to carry the WWF Championship after Andre the Giant surrendered it to him?

    Click for Spoiler:
    It wouldn't take much to redo this occurrence, as really I'm only pondering what would happen if a consequence of the match had been different.

    This episode of Main Event was basically a lead-in for WrestleMania IV. The Championship went to nobody, and this in-turn setup an opportunity for Randy Savage to become the WWF Champion by defeating Ted DiBiase in the finals of that tournament.

    I imagine that we don't get the Earl/Dave Hebner spot at The Main Event. That match simply ends with the controversy of Ted being awarded a belt that was surrendered to him, and Jack Tunney interrupting the moment saying that the title cannot be surrendered and that the title is now in limbo. The tournament at WrestleMania IV is simply a means of determining who will be the number 1 contender for the WWF Championship, which ends with Macho Man defeating Andre. The main event of WrestleMania IV is instead Hulk Hogan vs Ted DiBiase, where Ted DiBiase is not allowed to have any of his employees at ringside. Macho Man guards the entryway, and manages to fight off a few of Million Dallor Man's lackeys. Dave Hebner is the referee, and Ted eventually manages to get a fast-count pin on Hogan. Earl Hebner rushes to the ring and shenanigans ensue, until Dave kicks Earl out of the ring and has a hundred dollar bill fall from his pocket. Hogan throws Dave out of the ring, and eventually Earl makes it back into the ring. Jack Tunney comes out and announces that the match will continue. Hogan obliterates Ted, but when he attempts to pin Ted after the leg drop, Earl acts as if he has something in his eye. Randy goes to check on Earl, and is pepper sprayed by Earl. Virgil rushes to the ring, and hits Hogan over the head with the million dollar championship. Ted manages to roll over and pin Hogan. Ted's employees rush to the ring and hoist him on their shoulders, accompanied by both Hebners.

    Summerslam goes on as planned with a few tweaks to the storylines prior. Andre feuds with Randy Savage, and their feud eventually boils over to where The Mega-Bucks vs The The Mega-Powers match has Randy's shot at the World Championship at stake. Elizabeth influences the finish in the same way, and Randy's shot at the World Championship is left intact.

    The Survivor Series Main event becomes The Mega-Powers vs The Mega-Bucks with higher stakes. It's announced that Randy Savage, as sole captain of the team, will be awarded the WWF Championship if his team wins. This match is Randy's shot at the WWF Championship. Jesse Ventura is again tasked to be the referee. Ted's team now consists of Akeem, Big Boss Man, Haku, and Andre the Giant. Savage's team now consists of Hogan, Jake Roberts, Hercules, and Jim Duggan. Andre and Hogan start, and go after each other in the same manner as had originally happened at WrestleMania IV, causing Jesse Ventura to disqualify both men. Jake Roberts is next eliminated by Akeem, but Akeem is chased to the back with Damien and thus is counted out. Haku eliminates Hercules and Jim Duggan, and is then eliminated by Randy Savage. Randy Savage goes to war with Big Boss Man, and Elizabeth is hurt during the melee. Randy pins Big Boss Man, and is forced to fight a fresh Million Dollar Man. Hogan comes to the ring to help Elizabeth, and Ted DiBiase locks in the Million Dollar Dream while Randy is distracted. Randy manages to pull Ted to the corner, and kicks off of it to fall back and pin Ted DiBiase.

    Randy Savage becomes the WWF Champion, and begins his feud as originally scheduled with Hogan over the belt. Ted DiBiase was allowed, by this chain of events, to have conducted numerous promos and vignettes where he brags that he bought the belt and that nobody had a price for him.
    Last edited by EnviousDominous; 07-29-2019 at 08:17 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Spidercanrana View Post
    If the internet has taught me anything, it's that a show is either touched by God's mighty pen or Satan's diseased penis.

  2. #2
    Senior Member EnviousDominous's Avatar
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    Sometimes we dream small, sometimes we dream big.

    I think I'm going to dream big.

    What if Vince McMahon had been convicted of distributing anabolic steroids in 1994?

    Click for Spoiler:
    Most of us know the history on this matter, so I won't get overly detailed here.

    My basic understanding is that in early 1991 the Federal Government enacted The Anabolic Steroids Control Act which made anabolic steroids a schedule III controlled substance, and thus anabolic steroids could only be legally distributed and obtained if substantiated by medical reasons. The WWF regularly consulted with a man known as Dr. George Zahorian, and he would regularly approve prescriptions and ship controlled steroids to WWF headquarters and to arenas where WWF events were occurring. The FBI then investigated the WWF and Dr. Zahorian, culminating in a trial in 1994 that almost resulted in sweeping convictions for WWF staff and management that would have surely ended the WWF.

    Supposedly, prior to a planned raid of Dr. Zahorian's office, a lawyer for Vince McMahon had been tipped off about the upcoming raid and Vince had Pat Patterson warn Dr. Zahorian to destroy evidence of Vince's corroborating with Dr. Zahorian to facilitate illicit use of steroids. When the raid occurred, Dr. Zahorian was shredding documents before being apprehended.

    Now; I believe that Vince was in fact providing steroids to WWF wrestlers. Was it wrong of him to do that? I really don't know. Maybe if they were obsessively juicing it up, they were avoiding other vices like crack or heroin. Do I think any less of a professional wrestler for abusing steroids? No, not really. This isn't serious competition, it's a circus where the clowns hit each other more. So, on a moral level, I don't think any less of Vince McMahon for breaking a law that really didn't hurt anyone.

    Looking back, it's not difficult to imagine that a few things could have gone differently. If Dr. Zahorian hadn't been warned to cook the books, the FBI could have found invoices with Vince McMahon's signature and recent corresponding receipts. There's also the fact that several wrestlers testified under oath that Vince McMahon had never encouraged his wrestlers to utilize steroids, save for Kevin Wacholz who was easily painted as a disgruntled and vengeful former employee. I believe that the prosecution was ill-prepared to deal with a trial where their intent was to indicated that a group of professional actors were bad people for committing a victimless crime.

    Anywho; I'm imagining what would have happened if Vince McMahon, Linda McMahon, Pat Patterson, and Dr. Zahorian had all gone to prison for eight year stints. I imagine that Hulk Hogan, Brian Blair, Rick Martel, The Ultimate Warrior, Roddy Piper, and Moondog Rex would have all been sent to prison as well.

    WCW was at a bit of a turning point during this time. Ted Turner fully trusted Eric Bischoff's judgement, and their biggest objective was to undermine the WWF at all costs. Jim Herd was long-gone, and Ric Flair was rightfully recognized as WCW's top guy. The option to beef up WCW's talent pool with big names is no longer available, as even well known names who might have escaped prosecution for illegal possession of a controlled substance would have carried the taint of being part of the scandal. This scandal would have also involved several WCW mainstays like The Steiner Brothers, Lex Luger, and The Road Warriors.

    Ric Flair, Rick Rude, Sting, and Vader would have been the saviors of professional wrestling. WCW would have been given the task of filling the void left by the WWF, and they would have gladly done so.

    I feel that as WCW would have worked well with other groups like NJPW and CMLL, and that this would hurt them. I feel that without a substantial catalyst doing things the "wrong" way like the WWF, WCW would struggle to find the motivation to produce a show nearly as provocative as we were given in the mid to late 1990s. With NJPW as a partner, I feel that women's wrestling would have had its revolution in the late 1990s, and that female wrestler would have and maintain their own regions within WCW.

    I believe that WCW would have rebranded themselves as a world-wide overseer unto national companies, and that those national companies would have oversight of regional companies. This would be an expanded version of the old territory system, only this time created with a more serious attitude toward legitimacy. WCW would maintain the world's only "World Championship", with the champion traveling freely to the recognized national companies to grant title opportunities to their national champions. The WCW talent pool would be top draws from the national companies, to give WCW a more cultured and worldly appearance. Talent would be grown in each regional company to eventually be brought up to the big time. ECW would be acquired in the early 1990s, and would not become Extreme Championship Wrestling. WCW would keep a tight grip over what type of content is shown under its umbrella. The WWF would have existed in a small way as a New York based regional company, and would have easily been absorbed by WCW.

    WCW wouldn't make nearly as much money as the WWF/WWE did, but they would be comfortable knowing that they are in full control of professional wrestling the world over. I imagine that on-screen leadership of WCW would be granted to Eric Bischoff who would also serve as head booker, and that this position would require a yearly behind the scenes vote. During Eric's time on top, he would controversially hire Vince McMahon and Pat Patterson as consultants, but still wouldn't be willing to humor any disgraced wrestlers. With Vince's influence, WCW would have an attitude-era style revolution in mid-2000.

    Getting to present day, Vince would have attempted an unsuccessful coup of sorts. Vince would have attempted to recruit several top names to work with him to create a new professional wrestling company, and this would have fallen apart due to the unthinkable reality where someone like Vince McMahon could run a professional wrestling company. Eric would have ensured that Vince never came close to being voted as the person in charge, and Vince would be "fired" on camera as a final nail in his career's coffin.

    Professional wrestling would be a redundant mix of large angry people wanting to fight each other, but it would be a more safe and respectful environment for the wrestlers.
    Quote Originally Posted by Spidercanrana View Post
    If the internet has taught me anything, it's that a show is either touched by God's mighty pen or Satan's diseased penis.

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  4. #3
    Senior Member EnviousDominous's Avatar
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    Sometimes little things make a big impact on history. It can be tough to pin down exactly what little thing was the most significant catalyst, but I'll try my best with this one.

    What if Jim Herd hadn't sent a premature termination notice to Ric Flair?

    Click for Spoiler:
    Back in 1991, the NWA was having its share of problems, mainly due to mismanagement from Jim Herd.

    Jim apparently had some kind of superiority complex where he had to undermine other people to feel superior to them. When Ted Turner acquired Jim Crockett Promotions, he appointed Jim Herd as the President of what was now being called "World Championship Wrestling". Ted apparently made that appointment based solely on Jim's past experience with promoting small-time professional wrestling on tv.

    The fact that Ric was the top guy of the NWA, and one of the biggest draws in professional wrestling, apparently encouraged Jim to want to redress Ric as a gimmick that he had created in that any success Ric enjoyed would be a direct result of Jim's influence. Fast forward to where the two men were at a breaking point. Ric would not agree to a new contract that was half of what he was making with his current contract, and he decided to leave World Championship Wrestling. Ric agreed to drop the Big Gold Belt to Barry Windham.

    Jim apparently became paranoid that Ric was going to demand more money prior to the match, and decided to terminate Ric's contract via fax days before the event. Jim apparently didn't realize one very important factor in making that decision, that The Big Gold Belt was awarded to performers who had paid a $25,000 deposit, and that Ric had every right to demand his deposit back if he was simply going to send back the belt without losing it properly.

    Let's imagine that Jim didn't become paranoid, and trusted that Ric would drop the belt as expected. Ric respected Barry Windham, and I believe that he would have put on a great show and elevated Barry's status.

    Ric would have become a free agent, and would have likely worked for the WWF in the same capacity as we remember, except without parading WCW's World Championship on WWF tv.

    Barry would have risen to super-stardom considering his momentum wouldn't have been halted, and that he would have been likely put up against Lex Luger. I think that the fans would have seen Barry as being the only person worthy of being the World Champion due to Flair passing the torch to him, and their passion would be more intense due to hatred of Lex Luger as being the guy that Jim Herd wanted to make into the top guy. I think that Jim Herd's time in WCW would have been up in 1992, due to fans being disgusted with his flashy style of promoting professional wrestling. I think that Barry would have maintained the Four Horsemen during this time, and that Flair would have returned as normal after Jim Herd left WCW.

    The most major ripple of this occurrence, would be that I don't think that Madusa would have junked the WWF Women's Championship on WCW tv. While I believe that Eric Bischoff would have still been made the Executive Vice President of WCW, I don't think that the idea of attacking the WWF in that way would have even crossed his mind. I think that acquiring Macho Man and Hogan would have been enough for Eric.

    I also believe that Bret Hart would have been allowed to defeat Shawn Michaels at Survivor Series, despite Shawn trying to convince Vince of the idea that Bret might betray the WWF. I feel that Bret would have subsequently wrestled Shawn Michaels at a lower profile event, and would have granted Shawn a clean win for the championship. I believe that WCW still would have offered Bret a king's ransom for showing up on Monday Nitro with the WWF Championship, but that Bret would have turned that money down.

    I feel that Bret would have still felt a level of angst toward the WWF after seeing that they had used the money that would have otherwise been used to extend his contract to temporarily hire Mike Tyson for sporadic appearances, and would have felt betrayed for that reason. The big difference is that Bret wouldn't have been carrying around a giant chip on his shoulder. Bret's issues with Hogan would have reached a boiling point, and I believe that Bret, Jim Neidhart, and the British Bulldog, would have returned to the WWF within a few years of being tossed around WCW in pointless matches. I believe that The British Bulldog would have still injured himself on The Ultimate Warrior's trap door, but that he would have been allowed to recover fully before returning to the ring.

    I feel that Bret would have been in talks with the WWF prior to leaving, and that a reunion of The Hart Foundation would have been planned. Now, keep in mind that I'm not trying to demonize anyone with what I'm about to share.

    I feel that Bret being in talks with the WWF would have included Owen in those talks. I feel that since Bret had left amicably and without attacking Vince's character, that Vince wouldn't have ever felt a need to humiliate Owen by making him play a clumsy version of The Blue Blazer. I feel that Owen would have grown into the gimmick of an anti-hero on par with Steve Austin, and that he would have maintained a long-running feud with Degeneration X. Bret's return would have become a Survivor Series mega-match with the newly reunited Hart Foundation vs Degeneration X, with the Hart Foundation coming out on top. I feel that DX would have encouraged a rivalry between Bret and Owen, and that Bret would have put Owen over.

    I might be going too far with this, but I've always wondered what could have happened differently to allow Owen to be with us today.
    Quote Originally Posted by Spidercanrana View Post
    If the internet has taught me anything, it's that a show is either touched by God's mighty pen or Satan's diseased penis.

  5. #4
    Senior Member EnviousDominous's Avatar
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    For some moments, I have a very vague understanding. Please feel free to correct me if my interpretation of history is a bit skewed.

    Lately I've been wondering about a major wrestling organization that would become a laughing stock.

    What if Verne Gagne had granted the AWA Championship to Hulk Hogan without terms?

    Click for Spoiler:


    It's my understanding that while Hulk Hogan was a viable top star in the AWA, Verne Gagne was hesitant to allow Hogan to be the AWA Champion due to Hogan's lack of a collegiate wrestling pedigree. Hogan was awarded the AWA Championship, and had it stripped from him immediately afterward. This potential test-run of Hogan's capability proved that the crowd wanted Hogan to be the AWA Champion. Verne offered Hogan a run with the belt under some very strict conditions (Verne gets a percentage of Hogan's overseas profits, Hogan marries Verne's daughter), which Hogan wisely refused considering he was being offered a job by Vince McMahon as the WWF's top star.

    I imagine that if Verne had seen the light, and knew that Hogan could be the man to give the AWA nation wide significance, prowrestling would be very different today.

    At AWA Super Sunday, Verne offers Hogan the belt and agrees to Hogan's desire to earn a significant percentage of his merchandise sales. The two men shake hands, and current champion Nick Bockwinkel is of informed of how the match will finish. Hogan and Nick wrestle a barn burner, with the finish being that Hogan pins Nick Bockwinkel clean without a ref bump or anyone being thrown over the top rope.

    The AWA is now white hot. Vince struggles to keep up, and he pushes Mr. Wonderful as his next "IT" guy, changing his gimmick to that of a patriotic American. Ted Turner gets in on the game by creating World Championship Wrestling as well.

    The big three companies all compete for the national spotlight, but Hogan makes it impossible for the other two companies to keep up.

    Hogan feuds with the likes of Jerry Blackwell, Bobby Heenan, Kokina Maximus, Bruiser Brody, Greg Gagne, Sergeant Slaughter, Rick Martel, Stan Hansen, etc. Hogan comes out looking like a superhero through every one of his feuds.

    Vince struggles to maintain loyalty with his performers, and never quite captures the magic that existed in the WWF during the mid to late 1980s.

    Ted Turner funnels more and more cash into the WCW brand, and their feud with the AWA makes the WWF into an afterthought for the AWA and WCW. Soon after, Greg Gagne decides to parley with Ted Turner, and they create wrestling super-cards featuring their top talents in dream matches. WCW and AWA create weekly shows that compete directly with each other, and also the WWF. The strategy being that the AWA and WCW directly attack each other on tv, and pay no attention to the WWF. Eventually Vince is coaxed into negotiating with Verne and Ted, and he reluctantly agrees to make a deal to be a part of a three way kayfabe feud between the three companies. Ted Turner becomes the head of this trifecta, where AWA is recognized for having the best athletes, WCW is recognized for having the toughest wrestlers, and the WWF is recognized for having the flashiest gimmicks.

    The ensuing feud loses its prestige from time to time, but enough people are regular fans of wrestling that there's always packed arenas to see the next redundant Champion vs Champion main event. Getting into the 1990s, Hogan is AWA's top guy, Ric Flair is WCW's top guy, and Bret Hart is the WWF's top guy.

    Professional Wrestling history is without any of the major controversies that occurred in our universe, and nothing like them ever occur. Ted and Verne keep a tight leash on Vince.
    Quote Originally Posted by Spidercanrana View Post
    If the internet has taught me anything, it's that a show is either touched by God's mighty pen or Satan's diseased penis.

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  7. #5
    Senior Member EnviousDominous's Avatar
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    How about these upcoming Wednesday Night Wars? Huh?

    The prospect of NXT and AEW going head to head made me think of a key moment during the war between WCW and the WWF.

    What if the incident at Madison Square Garden, otherwise known as the "Curtain Call", never happened?

    Click for Spoiler:


    In May of 1996, Scott Hall and Kevin Nash had taken a deal to work for WCW. The backstage atmosphere of the WWF had several wrestlers, to include Scott and Kevin, aligning themselves with different groups to help maintain their stature as prominent members of the WWF roster. Scott Hall, Kevin Nash, Shawn Michaels, and Triple H were all members of "The Kliq". Shawn had the profound ability to speak with Vince at nearly any time he wanted, and be able to influence how Vince perceives reality. All four members of the Kliq were expected to wrestle in a tag-team match that depicted Scott Hall and Kevin Nash as hate-filled opponents of Shawn Michaels and Triple H. Apparently, all four men decided to break character in the middle of the match and embrace each other. This moment caused great confusion, as most fans at this time were not aware of the scripted nature of professional wrestling's in-ring content. It's my belief that Shawn, filled with confidence, instigated the incident knowing that he would never be punished. Shawn wasn't punished, per se, but Triple H was most certainly punished for his participation in the incident.

    The King of the Ring tournament occurred only a month after this incident, and Triple H was booked to win the tournament. As part of his punishment, Triple H had this accolade taken away from him. Stone Cold Steve Austin was instead booked to win the tournament, at it was at this time that Stone Cold delivered his iconic "3:16" promo.

    Imagine, if you will, Shawn being a stalwart professional during this match. Shawn and Triple H get knocked around are forced to resort to heel tactics to distract and separate Scott and Kevin, where eventually Shawn makes use of a chair to incapacitate Kevin and Triple H makes the pin. Shawn and Triple H scramble out of the arena, and an interviewer comes to the ring to give a live interview to Kevin and Scott. Both men attack the interviewer, and give rude gestures to the crowd. The storyline goes that Kevin Nash and Scott Hall were fired for their actions, which has Shawn and Triple H bragging on tv that they got Kevin and Scott fired.

    Triple H rides the wave of momentous heat to a King of the Ring finals win over Jake the Snake. Scott Hall and Kevin Nash enter WCW in the same manner that they had entered before, under the guise that they're part of a coup on part of rogue WWF wrestlers.

    Stone Cold flounders in the WWF, being beaten in meaningless feuds by random prospects. He's eventually allowed to leave the WWF.

    Scott Hall and Kevin Nash speak well of Steve Austin to Eric Bischoff, and Steve is allowed to come back to WCW. Steve Austin had been conceiving the apex of the Stone Cold character since being in ECW long before being in the WWF, and at this point Eric is willing to hear him out on his big idea for a character.

    Scott Hall and Kevin Nash speak of a third man on many occasions, and give clues that indicate that Hulk Hogan will be the third man by using the term "brother" and "Whatcha' gonna' do?" At Bash at the Beach in July of 1996, Randy Savage is laid to waste in the ring. Hogan comes out, and the crowd erupts. As Hogan is about to enter the ring, he's attacked from behind by Stone Cold Steve Austin. Steve Austin pushes Hogan into the ring, and the three men lay him out as well. Austin then cuts a promo stating that Hogan always tells his little Hulkamaniacs to say their prayers and read their John 3:16s, and that Austin 3:16 says "I just whooped your ass". The three men proclaim themselves to be a New World Order in professional wrestling, and in his promo Stone Cold attacks the characters of Vince and Eric Bischoff.

    The crowd is given an nWo that attacks the WWF and WCW, and WCW far outpaces the WWF in the Monday Night Wars. The WWF struggles greatly to remain relevant, and eventually decides to let go of Bret Hart in the same manner as the Montreal Screwjob so that they can hire Mike Tyson to join Degeneration X and feud with Ken Shamrock. Everything falls apart for the WWF, as Degeneration X is the only viable gimmick they have and all other performers feel undervalued and discouraged by how Bret was let go.

    Hogan was originally meant to come back and beat Steve Austin on behalf of WCW, except that the crowd has at this point made Stone Cold into an untouchable professional wrestling God. Bret Hart comes into the picture, and he and Stone Cold wrestle epic matches, sparking the USA vs Canada feud that we all know, except this time under the umbrella of WCW.

    The WWF continues to lose money, and arenas go empty. Eventually Vince succumbs to pressure from USA, and is forced to sell the WWF to Ted Turner for pennies on the dollar as no other investors are willing to purchase them.
    Quote Originally Posted by Spidercanrana View Post
    If the internet has taught me anything, it's that a show is either touched by God's mighty pen or Satan's diseased penis.

  8. #6
    Senior Member EnviousDominous's Avatar
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    We've all screwed up here and there, we've also all had those "Whoa" moments where we managed to avoid screwing up catastrophically simply based on random undeserved chance.

    I think back to a time when the Monday Night Wars were just starting to heat up. I'm taking a lot of license here with dates, so bear with me as I try to make sense of an idea that's been kicking around in my head.

    I'm just going to come out and ask the following question:

    What if Lex Luger had won the WWF Championship at Summerslam 1993?

    Click for Spoiler:


    We fans used to be a very simple bunch. All you really had to do to get some heat was go out there and say something critical of the US.

    I was pretty young when the Yokozuna vs USA feud was in full swing. For me, our nation was fighting a losing battle against this sumo behemoth on an aircraft carrier, and one heroic man stepped up to represent his proud nation. That man was Lex Luger!

    Lex Luger, with the strength of an entire nation behind him, did the impossible. Lex Luger body slammed the 500+ pound Yokozuna. Two music videos were produced highlighting the occurrence, the Lex Express toured the nation to give motivational seminars. Lex Luger was getting huge pops anywhere he went.

    The time came when Lex Luger would finally have his chance to take the WWF Championship back for the US, and reign in a new era of rabid jingoism among fans. And Vince got cold feet it seems. According to Jim Cornette, Vince decided at the last minute to change the outcome of the match to a DQ as he wanted Lex's big moment to be at WrestleMania X.

    The Lex Express puttered out before WrestleMania X, and the WWF Championship was won back by the proud Canadian Bret Hart. The US crowd just seemed happy to see someone else as champion, and didn't mind too much about Lex getting demoted. Lex would still run around the WWF as an American icon, up until his surprise debut on the premier episode of Monday Nitro. This appearance was apparently a huge middle finger to Vince, as Lex had been deliberately stalling on signing a new WWF contract while being in talks with Eric Bischoff.

    I imagine that if Vince had allowed the Lex Express to tour the US with the WWF Championship in tow, it would have been one of the biggest mistakes the WWF ever made.

    Lex would travel across the country, his appearances at future shows would involve a bus full of cheering fans escorting Lex to arenas and sometimes to the ring. Merchandise would fly off shelves, and Vince would be too busy counting the money to notice that Lex was in talks with Eric Bischoff about WCW's big new project.

    With memories of Ric Flair's appearances on WWF tv with WCW's World Heavyweight Championship, Eric would make Lex an offer he wouldn't refuse.

    At the first episode of Monday Nitro, Eric Bischoff on commentary starts screaming "WHAT!? WHO!? GET HIM OUT OF HERE!"

    A star spangled bus pulls up in The Mall of America parking lot, and a camera is there to catch Lex Luger coming off the bus wearing the WWF Championship.

    Hogan and Savage are in the ring looking shocked to their core as Lex struts with his entourage into the mall as roaring fans cheer him on.

    Eric enters the ring and starts screaming "YOU CAN'T BE HERE! THIS IS OUR SHOW! GET SOME SECURITY!"

    Security shakes Lex's hand as he walks up, and they help escort him to the ring as Eric screams at staff members at ring side.

    Lex enters the ring to a huge pop form the mall, and steps up to Hogan who's seething with anger.

    Hogan cuts a promo stating that Lex might not know where he is, but that he's in a WCW ring staring at the WCW World Heavyweight Champion.

    Lex takes the mic, and explains that while he was touring the country he had heard of an event going on and he wanted to check it out. Lex explains that he's been running with boys for too long, and that now he's ready to test his might against real men.

    The show cuts off while Lex and Hogan are staring each other down.

    Lex Luger is eventually forced to relinquish the WWF Championship, and he does so by throwing it into a trash can on Monday Nitro.

    The WWF doesn't suffer any permanent damage, but the lasting images cause Vince heartache for the rest of his life.
    Quote Originally Posted by Spidercanrana View Post
    If the internet has taught me anything, it's that a show is either touched by God's mighty pen or Satan's diseased penis.

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